Celtic Moon by Jan DeLima ~ Book Review

Celtic Moon by Jan DeLima
Series:Celtic Wolves #1
Published byPenguin on September 24th 2013
Genres:Paranormal Romance
Pages: 304
Format: eBook
Goodreads

Like father, like son… Sophie Thibodeau has been on the run from the father of her son for more than fifteen years. Now her son, Joshua, is changing, and her greatest fears are about to be realized. He’s going to end up being just like his father—a man who can change into a wolf. Dylan Black has been hunting for Sophie since the night she ran from him—an obsession he cannot afford in the midst of an impending war. Dylan controls Rhuddin Village, an isolated town in Maine where he lives with an ancient Celtic tribe. One of the few of his clan who can still shift into a wolf, he must protect his people from the Guardians, vicious warriors who seek to destroy them. When Sophie and Dylan come together for the sake of their son, their reunion reignites the fierce passion they once shared. For the first time in years, Dylan’s lost family is within his grasp. But will he lose them all over again? Are Joshua and Sophie strong enough to fight alongside Dylan in battle? Nothing less than the fate of his tribe depends on it…

*I received a free copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.*

The story is about Sophie, who returns to her son’s father (after sixteen years of hiding from him) because she believes her son needs his father’s help to learn how to shift into a wolf. The father, Dylan, thinks Sophie should just accept him as her husband because they had made unofficial vows when she was younger. Sophie fears Dylan and the people who live in his territory and initially has no interest in a relationship with Dylan other than what is needed to help their son.

I enjoyed reading Celtic Moon, particularly because of how headstrong Sophie was. She refused to let Dylan control her. Here is a quote that sums up her response to his bossy manner: “The very thought went up her ass sideways.” (p. 73)

I also liked how both Sophie and Dylan had to work to see the other’s side of things. Sophie did end up conforming, but at least Dylan learned enough to give her choices instead of demanding everything.

The writing style pleased me as well. The story is told from multiple points of view in 3rd person, past tense. In some stories, first person works better, but for this story, third person was perfect. I liked the shifting third person point of view because it allowed me to see what both Dylan and Sophie were thinking.

Some other aspects of this book that I liked were: the depth of the Celtic mythology, the degree of character development, and the unforced progression of the romance. I also liked how it was hinted that Elen had more power than what she used, but the extent of that was hidden until the time Elen actually needed to use that additional power. Another great aspect was Sophie’s dedication to her son, which required allowing him to grow into a man.

I didn’t have many dislikes. At the beginning of the book, I was dropped into the middle of a situation. Normally, that would be good because it’s important to get to the action, but it seemed too abrupt. I felt like I was missing something, like this was a chapter two instead of a chapter one. Later, the book suffered from the opposite problem. Instead of going too fast, it went too slow in parts because of too many flashbacks. Some of the flashbacks were necessary, others were not. And–I’ll mention for those who share my pet peeve on this–the author refers to body parts as his or her “sex.”

Overall, I thought Celtic Moon was a great book, one that would definitely appeal to readers who like stories about wolf shifters and their mates.

Although I have seen this book listed as urban fantasy, I don’t believe it is. The goals of helping Joshua shift and protecting everyone from the Guardians seem secondary to the goal of Dylan and Sophie falling in love again. So, based on that, I say it’s paranormal romance.

Either way, I think readers of both genres will enjoy this book as long as they like a lot of focus on the main character’s relationship. There is some action and fighting to appeal to urban fantasy readers, but they need to be prepared for things like a man claiming a woman as his and descriptive sex scenes, which are more common in paranormal romance.

If you haven’t read Celtic Moon yet, I strongly recommend it. The best part of it was the tension between the characters, which is satisfactorily resolved by the end of the book.

 

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